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Spain: Red Ribbons with medicine cans and candles

The Asturias anti-AIDS committee made red ribbons and lit candles in a medicine cans on the celebration of International AIDS Day.

Relatives prepare the pyre for the cremation of a relative who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at a crematorium in Ajmer, Rajasthan.Relatives prepare the pyre for the cremation of a relative who died due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at a crematorium in Ajmer, Rajasthan.
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Daniele Sinibaldi the candidate for Mayor of the centre-right of the Municipality of Rieti in the 2022 local elections.Daniele Sinibaldi the candidate for Mayor of the centre-right of the Municipality of Rieti in the 2022 local elections.

Daniele Sinibaldi the Candidate for Mayor of the Centre-Right of Rieti

Daniele Sinibaldi the candidate for Mayor of the centre-right of the Municipality of Rieti in the 2022 local elections.

SG Antonio Guterres and Chairperson of the African Union Commission Moussa Faki Mahamat conduct join press conference at UN Headquarters. Press conference was held after fifth African Union – United Nations Conference at UN. Antonio Guterres and Moussa Faki Mahamat discussed current situations in African countries including Sudan, Ethiopia and Libya, COVID-19 pandemic and recent emergency of Omicron variant and latest travel ban on Southern Africa.SG Antonio Guterres and Chairperson of the African Union Commission Moussa Faki Mahamat conduct join press conference at UN Headquarters. Press conference was held after fifth African Union – United Nations Conference at UN. Antonio Guterres and Moussa Faki Mahamat discussed current situations in African countries including Sudan, Ethiopia and Libya, COVID-19 pandemic and recent emergency of Omicron variant and latest travel ban on Southern Africa.

Press conference by SG Antonio Guterres and Chairperson of the African Union Commission Moussa Faki

SG Antonio Guterres and Chairperson of the African Union Commission Moussa Faki Mahamat conduct join press conference at UN Headquarters. Press conference was held after fifth African Union – United Nations Conference at UN. Antonio Guterres and Moussa Faki Mahamat discussed current situations in African countries including Sudan, Ethiopia and Libya, COVID-19 pandemic and recent emergency of Omicron variant and latest travel ban on Southern Africa.

Icicles are seen on tree branches at Drung region of Tangmarg, about 50 kilometers from Srinagar city. A cold wave further tightened its grip in Jammu and Kashmir with most places in the state recording sub-zero temperatures. The sub-zero temperatures has frozen many water bodies in Kashmir and even drinking water taps have frozen at some places.Icicles are seen on tree branches at Drung region of Tangmarg, about 50 kilometers from Srinagar city. A cold wave further tightened its grip in Jammu and Kashmir with most places in the state recording sub-zero temperatures. The sub-zero temperatures has frozen many water bodies in Kashmir and even drinking water taps have frozen at some places.

India: Freezing cold in Kashmir

A cold wave further tightened its grip in Jammu and Kashmir with most places in the state recording sub-zero temperatures. The sub-zero temperatures has frozen many water bodies in Kashmir and even drinking water taps have frozen at some places.

The Asturias anti-AIDS committee made red ribbons and lit candles in a medicine cans on the celebration of International AIDS Day.The Asturias anti-AIDS committee made red ribbons and lit candles in a medicine cans on the celebration of International AIDS Day.

Spain: Red Ribbons with medicine cans and candles

The Asturias anti-AIDS committee made red ribbons and lit candles in a medicine cans on the celebration of International AIDS Day.

The organizing staff represented by Scuderia Vesuvio and Rombo Team left nothing to chance for the most important end-of-season event. On Saturday they turned the cars in the official speed tests, Formula Challenge, involving different categories: Formula Turismo / Sport, Formula Bicilindriche with the historic Fiat 126 and 500. The following day, on the other hand, was that of the actual races.The organizing staff represented by Scuderia Vesuvio and Rombo Team left nothing to chance for the most important end-of-season event. On Saturday they turned the cars in the official speed tests, Formula Challenge, involving different categories: Formula Turismo / Sport, Formula Bicilindriche with the historic Fiat 126 and 500. The following day, on the other hand, was that of the actual races.

Italy: Naples International Circuit

The organizing staff represented by Scuderia Vesuvio and Rombo Team left nothing to chance for the most important end-of-season event. On Saturday they turned the cars in the official speed tests, Formula Challenge, involving different categories: Formula Turismo / Sport, Formula Bicilindriche with the historic Fiat 126 and 500. The following day, on the other hand, was that of the actual races.

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MILAN, ITALY - APRIL 28: A nurse wearing protective gear show the blood test of a patient for COVID-19 testing an laboratory where rapid testing conducted to determine the disease of the Coronavirus. on April 28, 2020 in Milan, ItalyMILAN, ITALY - APRIL 28: A nurse wearing protective gear show the blood test of a patient for COVID-19 testing an laboratory where rapid testing conducted to determine the disease of the Coronavirus. on April 28, 2020 in Milan, Italy

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Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half.
Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.

Thirty-four-year-old Deep Narayan Nayak, a primary school teacher in the tribal village of Joba Attpara in Paschim Bardhaman district of the eastern state of West Bengal, has painted blackboards on the walls of houses and taught children on the streets for the past year. Like all other schools across the country, the Tilka Majhi Adivasi Primary School where Nayak teaches has been shut for a year-and-a-half. Digital India is a distant dream for underprivileged children who have been flung by the wayside as education all over the country turned online.